Articles Posted in Medical Malpractice News

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marijuanaPatients have a right to be treated appropriately by health care providers who are diagnosing them and prescribing medications for them. If you or your loved one has been harmed by a medical professional’s prescription or recommendation regarding a drug, you need to consult a Baltimore medication error attorney as soon as possible.

The Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission records list a total of 520 eligible medical marijuana providers statewide. The first batch of medical marijuana is expected to hit the market before the end of the year. Although it was legalized in 2013, the rollout has been slow due to a variety of reasons. In Maryland, the law limits the use of medical marijuana to patients with certain documented health conditions, such as wasting syndrome, severe pain, glaucoma, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Of course, this is not an exhaustive list.

Some Maryland physicians are worried about the possibility of medical malpractice lawsuits stemming from the use of medical marijuana. In an effort to address this, one doctor has created a legal release form for patients to sign. If patients don’t sign it, he won’t “recommend” the marijuana. The term “recommendation” is used over “prescription” because federal law still prohibits the prescription of marijuana, so many physicians use the term to shield themselves from potential liability.

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patient formUnfortunately, medical malpractice is the third-leading cause of death in the United States, according to a 2016 Johns Hopkins study. If you or someone close to you has been injured by a negligent medical professional, you should reach out to a skilled Baltimore medical malpractice attorney who can assess the merits of your case. At Arfaa Law Group, we understand this area of the law and can apply our knowledge to your case.

A new study, entitled Patients’ Experiences with Communication-and-Resolution Programs After Medical Injury, conducted by the Journal of the American Medical Association found that patients who have suffered an injury due to medical malpractice feel better when medical staff, particularly the physician who made the mistake, listen attentively to what they have to say about the experience.

The interview study of 40 patients, family members, and hospital staff revealed that patients have a strong need to be heard after a medical injury that is often unmet. Patients also wanted to know what the hospital or medical facility was doing to make sure the same error does not harm other patients. While 18 of 30 patient and family participants reported positive experiences with communication-and-resolution programs overall and continued to receive care at the hospital, they said hospitals seldom communicated information about efforts to prevent recurrences.

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