Articles Posted in Informed Consent

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contraceptionAn intrauterine device (IUD) is a little, T-shaped piece of plastic inserted into a woman’s uterus to prevent pregnancy. It is a type of long-term contraception that is considered to be 95 to 98 percent effective. One type of IUD releases a hormone (progesterone) and is replaced each year. The second type is made of copper and can be left in the body for five years. The most common shape, however, is a plastic “T” wrapped with copper wire. Mirena, Skyla, and ParaGard are common brands.

Prior to the placement of the IUD, the physician should take a woman’s medical history, conducting a physical examination as well as a pap test. After a full evaluation, the physician will be able to determine whether a woman can safely use an IUD. Some women are disqualified from using the device due to a variety of reasons. For example, a woman who suffers from abnormal vaginal bleeding or who is currently pregnant would not be able to use an IUD.

If it is deemed safe, a physician places an IUD into the uterus. The physician should take great care when doing this in order not to injure the woman. The improper insertion of an IUD can lead to a medical malpractice lawsuit against the physician.

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hospital

In non-emergency situations, medical professionals are required to obtain a mentally competent patient’s “informed consent” for a particular course of treatment. The idea of informed consent is to give patients a meaningful opportunity to be informed about their own health care decisions. If you or someone you know did not have a chance to provide informed consent, it is important to seek the help and guidance of a skilled Baltimore injury attorney. At Arfaa Law Group, we can analyze the facts of your case and determine whether you truly had a chance to make an informed decision about your health.

Under Maryland law, it is a physician’s duty to inform a patient of all potential benefits, risks and alternatives associated with the proposed procedure or course of treatment. This law is intended to give the patient all the information that would be needed to make an intelligent and informed decision about the treatment. It is important to note that a health care provider does not have to detail every possible risk associated with the treatment. Instead, the scope of disclosure is defined by what a hypothetical reasonable person would find material or important to the decision. A material risk is one which a physician knows or ought to know would be significant to a reasonable person in the patient’s position in deciding whether or not to submit to a particular medical treatment or procedure.

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